COVID-19 vaccines are essential for making our communities safer, getting people back to work and keeping our schools open. Even more important is making sure all members of our communities have equal access to these vaccines. That’s why CareOregon is working with federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and community-based organizations to increase access to the most vulnerable among us. “We’re all in this together” must truly apply to “all.”

We know it can be a challenge to find good information about the vaccine, which is why we’re offering this place for helpful, reliable information. As we learn more, we will continue to update this page.

On this page, you’ll find answers to these questions:

  • What are the best places to find up-to-date information about the COVID-19 vaccine?
  • Am I eligible for the vaccine?
  • How do I schedule a vaccination?
  • What should I do before and after I get the vaccine?
  • Is the vaccine safe and effective?
  • Where can I find other resources or information about the vaccines?

 

What are the best places to find up-to-date information about the COVID-19 vaccine?

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer up-to-date information on the COVID-19 vaccines. You can find their public COVID-19 vaccine pages here:

You can also call 211 (or TTY 711) for the latest information.

 

Am I eligible for the vaccine?

OHA has a plan to deliver the vaccine in phases, which you can view here. As of April 19, all adults in Oregon ages 16 and older will be eligible.

You can use the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool to see if you’re eligible and get notified by email or text when you are.

 

How do I schedule a vaccination?

If you are eligible, there are multiple ways to make an appointment to receive a COVID-19 vaccine:

If you have any questions about the vaccine related to your unique health condition, please contact your provider – they know your health best.

Many people are trying to find information right now, so please understand that wait times or website load times may be longer than normal.

 

What should I do before and after I get the vaccine?

  • Have food and water beforehand.
  • Wear clothes that allow you to remove or pull down your sleeve, in order to get the vaccine in your upper arm.
  • Wear a face covering.
  • Bring your Member ID card with you.
  • After you receive the vaccine, you will need to wait for 30 minutes for monitoring.
  • The whole appointment should take between 30 to 60 minutes.
  • The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are given in two doses. The first shot helps your immune system recognize the virus, and the second strengthens the immune response.
  • For those vaccines, ask about your second shot when you get the first shot.
  • The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is given in a single dose.
  • You will likely not have your choice of vaccine. Decisions about which vaccines are given to whom are based on availability.
  • It takes time for your body to build immunity after your shot. You are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after your second dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine, or two weeks after your single dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

 

Is the vaccine safe and effective?

The FDA has approved multiple vaccines for emergency use. These vaccines are safe and effective.

  • All emergency-approved COVID-19 vaccines had large-scale clinical trials. Tens of thousands of people received the vaccines during these trials — far more participants than were tested in most trials.
  • Trial participants came from a range of diverse backgrounds.
  • The FDA approved the vaccines for emergency use, after a careful review of the trial data.
  • There were no serious safety issues found during any of the vaccine trials.
  • The current available vaccines are Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson. (See resources for more information about the Johnson & Johnson vaccine below.)

 

Where can I find other resources or information about the vaccines?

The following materials are all in PDF format, so they can be easily downloaded and/or printed.